This “Green Lantern” micrometeorite has three glassy tails

I am delighted to present yet another fascinating micrometeorite, which was found in the gutter of a school near my home. NMM 507 is a delightful porphyritic olivine (PO) type particle measuring 0.2 mm with a very unique dark green color. As lovely as these features are, however, its three glassy tails make it truly rare.

Not long ago, this micrometeorite may have been part of a large speck of cosmic dust spinning rapidly in outer space. Upon atmospheric entry, I hypothesize that the larger particle was torn apart before cooling rapidly, perhaps in water. I suggest that this micrometeorite could be one of its pieces.

The glass lacks indications of weathering, so we know this little space rock is very fresh.

In this article, I present a color photo and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of NMM 507, so that you may enjoy all of its remarkable details. The SEM images have unsurpassed resolution, but the color photo reveals qualitative data, such as its color and translucence — what the object “really” looks like.

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about the cosmic moment that I believe formed this gem. Get in touch with me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter to let me know what you think of my hypothesis! I always welcome and appreciate alternative explanations!

Yours truly,

Jon Larsen

A SEM image of NMM 507 discovered by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and imaged by Jon Larsen and Egil Severin
A SEM image of NMM 507 by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Egil Severin. © Project Stardust, 2022.
A SEM detail image of one of the tails of NMM 507 a porphyritic olivine micrometeorite discovered by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and imaged by Jon Larsen and Egil Severin
A SEM image detail image of one of NMM 507’s glassy tails by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Egil Severin. © Project Stardust, 2022.
A SEM detail image of NMM 507 a porphyritic olivine micrometeorite discovered by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and imaged by Jon Larsen and Egil Severin
A SEM image detail image of NMM 507’s surface by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Egil Severin. © Project Stardust, 2022.

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Together we have amassed the world's most expansive collection of micrometeorites and we can't wait to share it with you.

Whether you're an expert in the field, an art collector with an appetite for treasures from space, or a budding stardust enthusiast, we hope you'll enjoy learning about our work.

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Jon Larsen & Jan Braly Kihle

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