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NMM 3324 is an enigmatic mystery micrometeorite discovered and photographed by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle

Through the years I have studied a large number of small spherical particles, called spherules, of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origins. Out of the many thousands of spherules that were easily classifiable, there have been a handful of cases where the origin remains uncertain. These enigmatic spherules are my favorite because they challenge existing knowledge […]

These three enigmatic spherules just solved a mystery

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

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We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

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Project Stardust Jon Larson and Jan Braly Kihle broke a world record by capturing an ultra high resolution visual image of NMM3193

Last Tuesday, Jan Braly Kihle and I came up with a new way to use our photo equipment that would maximize the magnification of our visual photography. We conceived of a process that would theoretically produce ten times as many individual photos as usual, capturing nearly three thousand single exposures! However daunting this technique seemed, […]

We just broke a world record with this new photo technique

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

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To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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NMM3220 is an urban micrometeorite discovered and photographed by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle

I’m delighted to share another stunning space rock, which was discovered by yours truly on a flat roof a couple of weeks ago and photographed by Jan Braly Kihle and me. NMM 3220 is a porphyritic olivine (PO) type micrometeorite that measures approximately 0.4 mm, which is slightly larger than the average size. This stunning […]

This urban micrometeorite has a yellow olivine crystal tooth

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

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To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

AS SEEN IN

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NMM 1918 is an unmelted micrometeorite discovered in Vestby Bauhaus by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and photographed by Jan Braly Kihle

Did micrometeorites kickstart life on Earth? In a new publication about dust from from asteroid Ryugu, Japanese scientists reveal that more than twenty types of amino acids have been detected in samples brought to Earth on Japan’s Hayabusa2 space probe. These findings confirm — for the first time — that organic compounds exist on asteroids in space. […]

Stardust could have provided the building blocks of life

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

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To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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Ultra high res image scoriaceous micrometeorite NMM 3328 discovered and photograhed by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle

Micrometeorite NMM 3328 is a scoriaceous type with large vesicles from degassing. The very small stone measures a mere 0.15 mm and has a partial magnetite rim, which gives the surface a shiny metallic luster. Note the view inside the large vesicle; large magnetite crystals. At the same time this is a record breaking photo! […]

Record breaking ULTRA high res photo of NMM 3328 is STUNNING

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

SCROLL TO READ

To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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NMM 1833 is a barely melted micrometeorite collected and photographed by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle

One of the surprising discoveries made by the French Concordia project (Michel Maurette/Cecile Engrand/Jean Duprat) in Antarctica in the year 2000, was porphyritic olivine (PO) micrometeorites with an abundance of iron sulfide. These rare, “barely melted” cosmic spherules have not been heated sufficiently during atmospheric entry to complete an elemental differentiation, where the iron accumulates as […]

Barely melted NMM 1833 is a wondrous beauty from space

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

SCROLL TO READ

To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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NMM3222 is a transitional micrometeorite discovered and photographed by Project Stardust founder Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle

It is thrilling to be surprised by yet another micrometeorite! Most of these beautiful emissaries from the depths of outer space fit quite nicely into the categories of micrometeorites as defined by the scientific community. However, every once in a while, I encounter strange particles that disrupt the current lexicon. It is therefore my pleasure […]

This transitional micrometeorite is a rare gem, indeed

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

SCROLL TO READ

To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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A collage of Project Stardust micrometeorites showing their relative size by Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle_cropped

Micrometeorites are small particles of cosmic dust that land on the Earth’s surface. Until 2015, when yours truly, Jon Larsen, discovered the world’s first urban micrometeorite, it was generally accepted that these tiny specks of stardust could only be found in extremely clean and remote areas. For decades, scientists studied micrometeorites from Antarctica and made […]

Size really does matter… for micrometeorites.

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

SCROLL TO READ

To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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New Project Stardust micrometeorite NMM 3164 Møvig Fort is a barred olivine discovered and photographed by Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle

Even though the study of micrometeorites is part of geosciences, the field also intersects with astronomy. First, wherever telescopes are directed in the dark night sky, there is cosmic dust to be seen. Second, micrometeorites pose a serious threat to the space industry, as even a small grain of cosmic dust can penetrate inches of […]

New micrometeorite found at astronomy society clubhouse

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

SCROLL TO READ

To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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NMM 3125 is a porphyritic micrometeorite with a brownish color due to iron impurities. This micrometeorite also features large olivine crystals and small chromites that sparkle all over its surface.

Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle announce a new PO-type micrometeorite, NMM 3125.

New micrometeorite has chromites and olivine crystals

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Micrometeorites     Jon & Jan     EVENTS

Micrometeorites 101:

This is a fantastic post title that will make people click

This is an enticing excerpt that will help people know that this is a must read!

READ NOW

We're so glad you're here.

Your curiosity means the world to us.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial lookalikes and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for decades.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites — in  breathtaking color.

Many years ago when Jon Larsen began his search for stardust in an urban environment, many believed that the task was simply impossible. There were too many terrestrial imposters and, after all, many wonderful scientists had tried and failed for nearly one hundred years.

In 2015, Norwegian jazz guitarist, Jon Larsen, discovered the world's first urban micrometeorite. Since then, his legendary friendship with minerologist, Jan Braly Kihle, has produced the world's most spectacular high resolution images of micrometeorites -- in  breathtaking color.

SCROLL TO READ

To you we say, "Welcome!"; "Thank you!"; and "Believe in the impossible!"

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WINTER 2022 COLLECTION

Meet this season's micrometeorites

This season's collection features a variety of stunning micrometeorites. From mountainous cryptocrystalline turtlebacks and bewitching glass spherules to ultra rare giants. Available for a limited time only.

NMM 1448: V-TYPE

NMM 1448:  V-TYPE

Glass / Vitreous

Glass or vitreous type (V-type) micrometeorites each a temperature of up to 2000°C (3600°F) as they scream through the atmosphere..

These delicate, translucent spherules are difficult to find due to their lack of magnetism, since most of their metals evaporated during descent. 

NMM 1359:  CC-TYPE

Crypto-crystalline

Cryptocrystalline (CC-type) micrometeorites are composed of glassy particles with fine-grained crystallites that are too small to recognize as individual grains.

Many of these magnificent spherules feature metal beads and aerodynamic forms, while others have a "turtleback" shape with humps distributed evenly around the spherule.

NMM 1359:  CC-TYPE

NMM 500:  BO-TYPE

Barred Olivine

Barred olivine (BO-type) spherules are coarse-grained  micrometeorites made of the magnesium variety of the mineral olivine, forsterite, which is punctuated with small particles of magnetite.

The surface features striations that are formed when iron reacts with oxygen in the atmosphere. 

NMM 500:  BO-TYPE

NMM 1149:  PO-TYPE

Porphyritic Olivine

Porphyritic olivine (PO-type) micrometeorites are also made of forsterite, a type of olivine that is made of magnesium.

There are many morphological varieties of this type of micrometeorite; From evenly distributed small crystals, to crystals that increase in side, to extremely large or even possibly a single olivine crystal.

NMM 1149:  PO-TYPE

NMM 1271:  Sc-TYPE

Scoriaceous

When stardust does not reach a peak temperature of at least 1350°C (2500°F) during entry and deceleration, it barely melts. Volatile elements expand and escape in the form of gas bubbles, which results in a scoriaceous (SC-type) or vesicular micrometeorite.

Micrometeorites of this type are extremely difficult to find.

NMM 1271:  SC-TYPE

NMM 1271: G-, I-, CAT-typeS

Other Types

From G-types with dark silicate glass, I-types dominated by iron, and milky CAT spherules  enriched with calcium, aluminum, and titanium, to fossil, unmelted, and un-categorized micrometeorites.

There is no question that Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle's contributions have had a dramatic effect on the field.

NMM 1271:  G-/I-/CAT-TYPES

Jon and Jan are
EXCEPTIONAL ARTISTS AND SCIENTISTS. 

Michael Zolensky

NASA JOhnson Space Center

SEM Collection

COMING SOON

Never forget: YOU ARE SURROUNDED BY STARDUST, inside and out.

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The Atlas

of Micrometeorites

Never before has it been possible to see stardust in such a large format with crisp details. The 500+ color images are made possible by a new photo technology developed for this project by the author and mineralogist Jan Braly Kihle. 

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The Atlas of Micrometeorites provides an INVALUABLE RESOURCE
for stardust hunters around the world.

Matthew Genge

Imperial College, London

ORIGIN STORIES

Jon Larsen revolutionized the study of micrometeorites when he became the first person to discover a micrometeorite from an urban environment. Then a new form of art emerged when he and Jan Braly Kihle created the world's first high resolution photographs of micrometeorites in colour.

Learn about the singular moment that led to Jon's groundbreaking discovery
and the phone call that kickstarted a truly epic friendship.

Jon Larsen revolutionized the study of micrometeorites when he became the first person to discover a micrometeorite from an urban environment. Then a new form of art emerged when he and Jan Braly Kihle created the world's first high resolution photographs of micrometeorites in colour.

Learn about the singular moment that led to Jon's groundbreaking discovery and the phone call that kickstarted a truly epic friendship.

I HAVE TO KNOW

I'm ready. TEACH ME.

Micrometeorites

Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle have amassed the world's most expansive collection of urban micrometeorites and they want you to follow in their footsteps.

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HALLO and welcome!

We're Jon Larsen & Jan Braly Kihle

We are world renowned micrometeorite experts here to share our cosmic art and inspire the world to become star hunters.

STARDUST
is everywhere