WE'RE CELEBRATING OUR GRAND OPENING WITH 35% OFF SITEWIDE! CODE: HURRAY

35% OFF SITEWIDE! CODE: HURRAY

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL FINE ART ORDERS

FREE SHIPPING  ON ALL FINE ART ORDERS

NOW SHIPPING TO USA, CAN, NOR, NZL, AUS, CHE

NOW SHIPPING TO USA, CAN, NOR, NZL, AUS, CHE

SHIPPING TO UK & EU COMING SOON

SHIPPING TO UK & EU COMING SOON

ABOUT          EVENTS          BLOG

PROJECT STARDUST

SHOP FINE ART

FULL MENU

Micrometeorites of the  SEASON

Winter 2022 Collection

AS SEEN IN

AS SEEN IN

Winter 2022 Collection

PRESENTING THE 

It is our great pleasure to present to you the debut micrometeorite collection for our brand new Fine Art shop. 

These 20 stunning micrometeorites represent a diverse range of stardust particles. From mountainous cryptocrystalline turtlebacks and vivid glass spherules, to coarse porphyritic olivine particles reminiscent of pop characters like Billie Eilish and Pac-Man; to rare micrometeorites, including a combined type droplet and an iron-type spherule with a platinum group bead.

For years, our community members have asked us to make our fine art accessible, worldwide, so that those who cannot physically attend our gallery and museum exhibits may enjoy the wonder and awe of the cosmic micro-universe in their homes, offices, and schools.

We've worked tirelessly with our small team for nearly a full year, seeking the world's best manufacturers and designing an elevated digital experience to match the beauty of our art.

We feel a deep sense of joy and gratitude because we get to share the fruits of our labor with you today.

Thank you for your generous support, kind words, and sparkling curiosity! Words simply fail to describe how  glad we are that you are here!

Jon Larsen & Jan Braly Kihle

Yours Truly,

November 28, 2022

NMM 244, Blue Edit

NMM 244 is a striking cryptocrystalline (CC-type) “turtleback” micrometeorite that features an enchanting nickel-iron bead, embraced in the center of its olivine crystal peaks. Measuring 0.3 mm in diameter, its dark olivine crystals are composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate). NMM 244 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on August 8, 2015 in Bjørnemyr, Nesodden, Norway.

NMM 628, Blue Edit

NMM 628 is a fascinating cryptocrystalline (CC-type) micrometeorite that features an aerodynamic shape, iridescent blue surface formation, and a large nickel-iron bead. Its glassy black olivine body is mainly composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate). NMM 628’s most unique characteristic is its other-worldly blue surface formation, which was caused by oxidation. Measuring 0.3 mm, NMM 628 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on August 2, 2016 in Eikeli, Bærum, Norway.

NMM 646, Blue Edit

NMM 646 is an aerodynamic cryptocrystalline (CC-type) micrometeorite that features a warm brown body color and a large nickel-iron bead. Composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate), its brown olivine crystals create golden reflections along each heavenly edge. NMM 646 measures 0.3 mm and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on August 3, 2016 in Hosletoppen, Bærum, Norway.

NMM 650, Black Edit

NMM 650 is a spectacular cryptocrystalline (CC-type) micrometeorite that features a rare triangular aerodynamic shape and two nickel-iron beads. Its golden brown olivine body is mainly composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate) with traces of iron cation (Fe3+). Measuring 0.3 mm, NMM 650 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on August 3, 2016 in Hosletoppen, Bærum, Norway.

NMM 789, Blue Edit

NMM 789 is a glass (V-type) vesicular spherule that features a mesmerizing blue-green color and a nickel-iron bead. This unique micrometeorite’s blue-green glass body is mainly composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate) with traces of the iron cation (Fe2+). NMM 789 measures 0.3 mm and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on October 9, 2016 in Rosenvilde, Bærum, Norway.

NMM 928, Blue Edit

NMM 928 is a cryptocrystalline (CC-type) “turtleback” micrometeorite. Its delicate nickel-iron bead rests atop mountains of black olivine crystals composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate). Measuring 0.4 mm, which is slightly larger than average micrometeorite, NMM 928 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on March 28, 2017 in Nordre Follo, Vinterbro, Norway.

NMM 1149, Blue Edit

NMM 1149 is a coarse porphyritic olivine (PO-type) spherule that features a bold color gradient that blends its black crown with its vivid green base, reminiscent of Billie Eilish’s early hairstyle in reverse. This unique micrometeorite is characterized by green olivine crystals composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate) with traces of iron cation (Fe2+). NMM 1149 measures 0.3 mm and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on July 29, 2017 in Sognsveien, Oslo, Norway.

NMM 1196, Blue Edit

NMM 1196 is a cryptocrystalline (CC-type) micrometeorite that features an elongated aerodynamic form with a large nickel-iron bead. Its body features dark olive green olivine crystals composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate). Measuring 0.4 mm, which is slightly larger than average, NMM 1196 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on May 8, 2018 in Vallhalla, Oslo, Norway.

NMM 1359, Blue Edit

NMM 1359 is a cryptocrystalline (CC-type) micrometeorite that features a rare triangular aerodynamic shape, a hypnotic golden body, and a large nickel-iron bead. Its body is characterized by olivine crystals the color of warm Autumn sunshine, composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate) with traces of iron cation (Fe 3+). NMM 1359 measures 0.3 mm and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on June 8, 2018 in Skedsmo, Akershus, Norway.

NMM 1448, Blue Edit

NMM 1448 is an aerodynamic vesicular glass (V-type) spherule with a large opening in the back and a large nickel-iron bead in the front. In addition to its rare green glass color, this sneaky micrometeorite has a second small nickel-iron bead hidden on its side and blends layers of olivine crystals on top of its main glass body. Measuring 0.4 mm, which is just larger than average, NMM 1448 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on June 27, 2018 in Liertoppen, Akershus, Norway.

NMM 2365, Black Edit

NMM 2365 is a coarse porphyritic olivine (PO-type) spherule that features two nickel iron beads and a rare gray-green body color. Lovingly known as the “Pac-Man” micrometeorite, NMM 2365’s gray-green body is characterized by olivine crystals composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate). NMM 2365 measures 0.3 mm and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on June 12, 2020 in Eiksmarka, Bærum, Norway.

NMM 2583, Blue Edit

NMM 2583 is an aerodynamic crystalline droplet with a long glass tail. This rare particle features characteristics of both cryptocrystalline and glass micrometeorites, making it a unique composite (CC/V-type) micrometeorite. Its brown olivine/glass body is composed mainly of forsterite (magnesium silicate) with traces of iron cation (Fe3+), and two small nickel-iron beads. Measuring 0.5 mm, NMM 2583 is significantly larger than average sized micrometeorites and is therefore considered a giant. Discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on August 1, 2020 in Bjørnemyr, Nesodden, Norway, NMM 2583 is a rare treasure, indeed.

NMM 2679, Blue Edit

NMM 2679 is an aerodynamic cryptocrystalline (CC-type) "turtleback" that is crowned with a large nickel-iron bead surrounded by a sulfide rim. Its body is characterized by mountainous black olivine crystals composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate). NMM 2679 measures 0.3 mm and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on August 25, 2020 in Vallhall, Oslo, Norway.

NMM 2752, Black Edit

NMM 2752 is a rare, flawless glass (V-type) spherule that features a large nickel-iron bead with a sulfide rim and a seductive deep blue iridescent body color. Unlike most other glass micrometeorites, this complete spherule is undamaged, indicating it was found shortly after its perilous descent to Earth. This true treasure from space has a body characterized by dark greenish-gray forsterite (magnesium silicate) with vivid blue oxidation on its surface. Measuring 0.3 mm, NMM 2752 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on September 21, 2020 in Nordkisa (Ahlsell) Norway.

NMM 2807, Black Edit

NMM 2807 is an iron (I-type) metallic superellipsoid micrometeorite that features a platinum group bead. This truly rare particle has a body characterized by iron oxide composed of wüstite (FeO) with a large platinum group nugget made of numerous elements including ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, and platinum. NMM 2807 measures 0.4 mm, which is slightly larger than average, and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on November 6, 2020 in Drøbak (Biltema), Norway.

NMM 2842, Blue Edit

NMM 2842 is an aerodynamic cryptocrystalline (CC-type) "turtleback" with a rare triangular shape and large nickel-iron bead with a sulfide rim. Its body is characterized by ​​dark olivine composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate). While this micrometeorite is certainly attractive aesthetically, its most striking feature is its size. Measuring a whopping 0.8 mm, NMM 2842 is a supergiant and is Project Stardust’s biggest micrometeorite yet. This rare gem was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on June 1, 2021 in Sarpsborg (Borgarsyssel), Norway.

NMM 2889, Black Edit

NMM 2889 is a barred olivine (BO-type) aerodynamic ellipsoid micrometeorite that features a captivating dark gray body color and fascinating circular crystal formations on its surface. Its body is characterized by dark olivine plate crystals punctuated by interstitial magnetite crystals that glimmer in the light. NMM 2889 measures 0.4 mm, which is just larger than average, and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on June 4, 202 in Sarpsborg (Storbyen), Norway.

NMM 3162, Blue Edit

NMM 3162 is a cryptocrystalline (CC-type) droplet that features a distinct aesthetic reminiscent of a space carrot. Its main body is characterized by golden olivine crystals composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate) with traces of iron cation (Fe 3+), and a striking nickel-iron bead. Measuring 0.3 mm, NMM 3162 was discovered in Switzerland by Daniel Thommen and photographed by Project Stardust’s Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle in March 2022.

NMM 3230, Black Edit

NMM 3230 is a porphyritic olivine (PO-type) spherule featuring an alluring light brown color and large pyramidal olivine crystals that dance in the light. This charming micrometeorite is characterized mainly by brown olivine composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate), NMM 3230 has 2-3 secret nickel-iron beads that are nearly impossible to detect without close inspection. Measuring 0.3 mm, NMM 3230 was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on April 26, 2022 in Askim (Continental), Norway.

NMM 3661, Blue Edit

NMM 3661 is a coarse porphyritic olivine (PO-type) spherule that features a rich black hue and bewitching crystal formations that wrap around its surface. It is characterized by spellbinding black olivine crystals composed of forsterite (magnesium silicate) that play with the light. NMM 3661 measures 0.3 mm and was discovered by Project Stardust Founder Jon Larsen on August 22, 2022 in Skedsmo (Grove Knudsen), Norway.

Framed Prints

SHOP NOW

CANVASES

SHOP NOW

Panels

SHOP NOW

Bundles

COMING SOON

NMM 1448: V-TYPE

NMM 1448:  V-TYPE

Glass / Vitreous

Glass or vitreous type (V-type) micrometeorites each a temperature of up to 2000°C (3600°F) as they descend through the atmosphere..

These delicate, translucent spherules are difficult to find due to their lack of magnetism, since most of their metals evaporated during descent. 

NMM 1359:  CC-TYPE

Crypto-crystalline

Cryptocrystalline (CC-type) micrometeorites are composed of glassy particles with fine-grained crystallites that are too small to recognize as individual grains.

Many of these magnificent spherules feature metal beads and aerodynamic forms, while others have a "turtleback" shape with humps distributed evenly around the spherule.

NMM 1359:  CC-TYPE

NMM 500:  BO-TYPE

Barred Olivine

Barred olivine (BO-type) spherules are coarse-grained  micrometeorites made of the magnesium variety of the mineral olivine, forsterite, which is punctuated with small particles of magnetite.

The surface features striations that are formed when iron reacts with oxygen in the atmosphere. 

NMM 500:  BO-TYPE

NMM 1149:  PO-TYPE

Porphyritic Olivine

Porphyritic olivine (PO-type) micrometeorites are also made of forsterite, a type of olivine that is made of magnesium.

There are many morphological varieties of this type of micrometeorite; From evenly distributed small crystals, to crystals that increase in side, to extremely large or even possibly a single olivine crystal.

NMM 1149:  PO-TYPE

NMM 1271:  Sc-TYPE

Scoriaceous

When stardust does not reach a peak temperature of at least 1350°C (2500°F) during entry and deceleration, it barely melts. Volatile elements expand and escape in the form of gas bubbles, which results in a scoriaceous (SC-type) or vesicular micrometeorite.

Micrometeorites of this type are extremely difficult to find.

NMM 1271:  SC-TYPE

NMM 1271: G-, I-, CAT-typeS

Other Types

From G-types with dark silicate glass, I-types dominated by iron, and milky CAT spherules  enriched with calcium, aluminum, and titanium, to fossil, unmelted, and un-categorized micrometeorites.

There is no question that Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle's contributions have had a dramatic effect on the field.

NMM 1271:  G-/I-/CAT-TYPES

FIREBALL: Visitors from Darker Worlds

SEE JOn & Jan IN

From directors Werner Herzog and Clive Oppenheimer, this remarkable journey across our planet and universe explores how meteorites, shooting stars, and deep impacts have awoken our wonder about other realms-and make us rethink our destinies.

Limited Edition

The Atlas

of Micrometeorites

Never before has it been possible to see stardust in such a large format with crisp details. The 500+ color images are made possible by a new photo technology developed for this project by the author and mineralogist Jan Braly Kihle. 

SHOP NOW

The Atlas of Micrometeorites provides an INVALUABLE RESOURCE
for stardust hunters around the world.

Matthew Genge

Imperial College, London

ORIGIN STORIES

Jon Larsen revolutionized the study of micrometeorites when he became the first person to discover a micrometeorite from an urban environment. Then a new form of art emerged when he and Jan Braly Kihle created the world's first high resolution photographs of micrometeorites in colour.

Learn about the singular moment that led to Jon's groundbreaking discovery
and the phone call that kickstarted a truly epic friendship.

Jon Larsen revolutionized the study of micrometeorites when he became the first person to discover a micrometeorite from an urban environment. Then a new form of art emerged when he and Jan Braly Kihle created the world's first high resolution photographs of micrometeorites in colour.

Learn about the singular moment that led to Jon's groundbreaking discovery and the phone call that kickstarted a truly epic friendship.

I HAVE TO KNOW

Thank you for
stopping by!

It truly means the world to us that you've come to learn about micrometeorites and explore our shop. This is our life's work and sharing it with you brings us the greatest joy.

Come get to know us and how we came to be here with you >

I'm ready. TEACH ME.

Micrometeorites

Jon Larsen and Jan Braly Kihle have amassed the world's most expansive collection of urban micrometeorites and they want you to follow in their footsteps.

WORLD-RENOWNED EXPERTS ON

Connect & LEARN

SHOP

CONTACT    |     ACCOUNT

Asset 3

HALLO and welcome!

We're Jon Larsen & Jan Braly Kihle

We are world renowned micrometeorite experts here to share our cosmic art and inspire the world to become star hunters.

STARDUST
is everywhere